(336) 701-1700 ext. 103 Theresa@ForsythFutures.org

Socialization

Socialization examines socialization activities as a measure of interpersonal support, including socialization activities with family, friends, and neighbors, and associated satisfaction with socialization activities.

Indicators:

Socialization Satisfaction

32% of adults aged 60 or older would like to be doing more socially. When we look at the data by race and income, we see higher percentages of African Americans and low and mid-income groups wanting to do more socially compared to the White population and highest income group, respectively.

The most commonly cited barriers for people who would like to be doing more socially include health reasons, lack of money, lack of time, lack of transportation, and not knowing where to go.

Socialization Opportunities

34% of adults aged 60 or older live alone. When we look at the data by gender, race, and income, we see higher percentages of females, African Americans, and low and mid-income groups compared to males, the White population, and the highest income group, respectively.

24% of adults aged 60 and older do not have close family that lives nearby. When we look at the data by gender, race, and income, we see higher percentages of males, African Americans, and the high-income group not having close family nearby compared to females, the White population and lower income groups, respectively.

19% of adults aged 60 and older who live alone do not have close family nearby, roughly 4,700 people.

17% of adults aged 60 and older are contacted by family, friends, or neighbors once a week or less. When we look at the data by gender, we see a higher percentage of males having contact once a week or less compared to females.

15% of adults aged 60 and older who live alone are contacted once a week or less by family, friends, or neighbors, roughly 3,700 people.

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